Interview with Art Professors Esmeralda Delaney and James C. Gamble

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Interview with Esmeralda Delaney

Q: What made you want to teach ceramics?
A: My mother wanted me to follow in her footsteps and be an RN because that was a good
profession for a woman. Unfortunately, I have a weak stomach and did not like the sight
of blood. Then she encouraged me to take typing and shorthand to become a secretary. In
typing class, the girl next to me had ceramics beforehand and brought some pots into
class I enquired about it and she told me she was doing ceramics classes. From that
moment on I was hooked I passionately wanted to try ceramics, which I did the next
semester and fell in love with it. Well, to make a long story short, my mother was worried
about me being an artist and pushed me towards a degree in education.

Q: What issues did you encounter when becoming a professor?
A: Passing the math requirement.

Q: How long did your education take?
A: About ten years. Two at GCC, Three years at ASU (because I loved going to school).
Two more years at ASU for an MA in Art Education, and three years at Texas Tech for
an MFA.

Q: What do you find the most challenging about teaching ceramics?
A: Students who do not listen and ask me questions I first went over, because they were not
paying attention.

What do you find most rewarding about teaching ceramics?
A: I love to see how the students love what they make. They are so proud and want to show
everyone what they have created. I also love the first sight after opening the kiln up.

Q: How long have you been teaching ceramics?

A: Two years at GCC as an adjunct, twenty one years at Grand Canyon University but I left
because they got rid of the Art department in 2006, and ten years at GCC full time. I also
taught for two years in graduate school at Texas Tech as a TA. Thirty five years in total.

Q: Did ceramics help you channel your emotions and feelings as you were growing up?
A: Yes, ceramics and listening to Rod Stewart got me through life.

Q: If you could no longer teach ceramics, what would you be doing?
A: I would always do ceramics at my home studio including mosaics with my handmade
figurative ceramic title.

Q: When you retire, will you continue doing ceramics as a hobby?
A: Yes — it is my lifelong passion!

 


 

Interview with James C. Gamble

Q: What made you want to teach ceramics?
A: I had always planned on being part of academics, started going for chemistry, and then
switched to fine Arts.

Q: What issues did you encounter when becoming a professor?
A: Not quite a professor yet due to economic pressure on colleges causing issues with
availability of full time positions

Q: How long did your education take?
A: Four years than three years grad school

Q: What do you find the most challenging about teaching ceramics?
A: Getting students to avoid procrastination staying on task.

Q: What do you find most rewarding about teaching ceramics?

A: Joy of creating

Q: How long have you been teaching ceramics?
A: Eight years

Q: Did ceramics help you channel your emotions and feelings as you were growing up?
A: Not really did not do ceramics until late High School.

Q: If you could no longer teach ceramics, what would you be doing?

A: While I am mostly trained as an educator, I would be able to work in Galleries or
Museums.

Q: When you retire, will you continue doing ceramics as a hobby?
A: Artists do not retire.